Study: Bee Deficiency Can affect Crops... As Global food security is menaced !

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A new study conducted in the United States found that a decrease in the number of bees in agricultural areas leads to a reduction in the quantities gained from some food crops, and this indicates that this decrease in the numbers of these pollinators may have serious consequences, related to ''global food security'' British Magazine.





The Magazine said that wild bees, such as Bumblebee, suffer from loss of flowering habitats, use of toxic pesticides, and are also increasingly suffering from the climate crisis.



At the same time, beekeepers tend to be polluted honey, but this species is still susceptible to disease, which has led to fears that three-quarters of the pollen-dependent food crops will decline globally due to insufficient numbers of bees.



The new study appears to confirm some of these concerns



Of the seven crops covered in the study growing in 13 states across America, five showed evidence that a lack of bee numbers hampered the number of crops that could be grown, such as apples, cranberries, and cherries.



The survey, conducted by a coalition of scientists from the United States, Canada, and Sweden, covered 131 crop fields to identify bee activity and abundance of crops.



Rachel Winfrey, an environmental scientist and pollinator at Rutgers University and one of the leading authors of the study published by the Royal Society, said:


 The crops that have received bees have produced many more crops



While the researchers found that the local wild bees contributed surprisingly a large part of pollination, despite the pollination in areas planted heavily, and largely devoid of the vegetation that supports them.




Wild bees are often pollinators more effective compared to honeybees, but research has shown that many species are experiencing a steep decline. The rusty patched bumblebee, for example, was the first species to be on the list of endangered species in the United States in 2017, after its numbers experienced an 87% decline in the past two decades.




Honeybees support large swaths of American farmland, are feverishly reproduced, and transported throughout the country in hives to meet the growing need to pollinate crops.


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